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What Does the Permanent Residency Card Look Like?

What Does the Permanent Residency Card Look Like?

The United States Permanent Resident Card, also known as a Green CardvisaThe actual U.S. Permanent Resident Card is not actually green, though it once was, but instead is white or an off-white shade. The card reads “Permanent Resident Card” across the top in capital letters and lists the card holder’s name in the format “Last Name, First Name” next. Processing down the card, in the next row, there are three key elements. On the left block is a suitable photo of the green card holder. On the right block is a fingerprint of the resident that was taken by a Citizenship and Immigration Services officer and processed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
In the middle block is essential human-readable identification information. This includes your nine-digit alien registration number (also known as an A#), the holder’s birth date, an immigration category code, the immigrant’s gender, his or her country of birth, the card’s expiration date, and the first date of residency of the permanent resident.  
The bottom half of the green card is devoted to a complex code that is most easily read by computer devices, but can be parsed out by a human processor. There are three lines composed of a mix of code letter-number binaries that serve to identify you, the subject, against official records.
The top line, from left to right, encapsulates this information: whether you are a United States resident or a resident commuter, the country issuing your Permanent Resident Card (presumably, the United States), again, your A number, and your case number. The middle line of the green card, from left to right, contains this data: your birth date, your sex, the card’s expiration date, and your country of birth. The bottom line contains your last, first and middle names and your father and mother’s first initials, space permitting. Any blank spaces are denoted by one or two brackets (“>”, “>>”). 

A Guide to Conditional permanent residence

A Guide to Conditional permanent residence

As stated, something that makes the immigration process infinitely harder to comprehend is the variability of terms even when their language would seem to suggest there is little proverbial wiggle room. The phrase “permanent residency”, to reemphasize, is misleading because there are standards so that one’s indefinite term of residency in the United States may become voluntarily or involuntarily voided.
On a related note, many people might think that a green card to the U.S. through a spousal relation will be their ticket to becoming a permanent resident; marriage is a popular route by which direct family members can be brought to the United States and can become citizens in a shorter amount of time than one would normally experience in ultimately making a bid for citizenship.
What the applicant trying to gain the status of a permanent resident through marriage must understand, however, is that there is another hurdle, conditional permanent residence, that must be crossed in the path to becoming a lawful permanent resident.
Marriage isn’t even the only institution that has to suffer on conditions placed on one’s immigrant status; the immigrant investor also must elect to removes conditions on his or her status if they filled out the application in a certain way. Below are summaries for the responsibilities that face the permanent resident through marriage and the entrepreneurial visa.
The permanent resident through marriage must petition jointly with their spouse on their own behalf using the I-751 form, Petition to Remove Conditions on Permanent Residence. Of course, the requisite fees for filing the motion and processing one’s biometrics information must be paid and received by the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services, a subset of the Department of Homeland Security.
In the interview with a consular official for the acquisition of status of a lawful permanent resident, marriage between an individual and their respective spouse must be evidenced, and this is usually accomplished by copies of forms that one filled out in tandem.
One who becomes a permanent resident through marriage must file this petition within ninety days of the two-year anniversary of attaining conditional residence, and is encouraged to file early to make sure he or she does not reach immigration officials late. As for the entrepreneur/immigrant investor, he or she may have to first file a petition for an EB-5 visa (for the spouse/fiancé(e) and future permanent resident, marriage visas such the K-1, K-3 or CR1 will be needed prior to the acquisition of a green card).
There are specific qualifications for the investor visa, such as the need to create or expand an existing business, the need to invest over a million dollars, and/or the need to create ten or more jobs. Upon eligibility, the proper form must be filed, and in these terms, there are comparisons and contrasts to be made between this route and becoming a permanent resident through marriage.
With conditional residency via marriage and entrepreneurship, that same two-year period less 90 days through which to wait is needed. However, whereas to apply to become a permanent resident, marriage visa holders must sign the I-751, foreign businesspeople must sign the I-829 Petition by Entrepreneur to Remove Conditions, obviously a different form from the I-751. 

2 Differences Between Permanent residency and citizenship

2 Differences Between Permanent residency and citizenshipWhen it comes to
immigration law and applications of permanent residency, it is important to
understand that, while some terms are interchangeable, others are not and are
subject to different material differences in American legal practice. For example,
an immigrant to the United States is in most cases a permanent resident as
well. Although, this would not include an illegal immigrant as they have no
lawful claim to residency in the country, permanent or not.



However, to
insinuate that the words “permanent resident” and “citizen”
mean the same thing would be to make a grievous misjudgment of the situation.
Although, for both classes of American resident, immigration law and
potentially the presence of a immigration lawyer may come into effect (citizenship
is processed by USCIS, even though this occurs after become a legal immigrant),
these rights of status are very separate indeed. The following is a partial
list of features that govern the divide between being a permanent resident and
a citizen:

1. “Permanent resident” usually denotes someone who has immigrated –
As people who grow up in the United States and anyone who fills out working
papers will know, you do not have to be an immigrant to become a citizen. In
fact, the majority of U.S. citizens become citizens of this country by virtue
of being born in the United States. Meanwhile, to become a permanent resident
most commonly means to leave a foreign nation and settle long-term on American
soil. Effectively, those who fall under the category of citizen are part of the
larger bloc of permanent residents, as citizenship through birth ensures that
one cannot be refused by one’s own country of origin unless they have acted
against the United States or formally waived their ties as a citizen.

2. The application processes follow different procedures – Regarding the
immigration process, there are seemingly a million forms processed by the U.S.
Department of State and the Department of Homeland
Security



Steps to Obtaining Permanent Residency

Steps to Obtaining Permanent Residency

To attain permanent residency, one must first determine his/her current immigrant status and eligibility. Eligibility requirements in regards to permanent residency will differ depending on the applicant’s immigrant status.
Upon determining immigration status, one must obtain a permanent residency application from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. The applicant will also need to have a person to sponsor the permanent residency application, which is typically a family member or employer. Gathering the necessary documentation will also be needed, which also depends on the applicant’s immigration status.
The process of obtaining permanent residency in the United States can prove to be complex, and it is often recommended to secure the services of an immigration lawyer to help with the procedure. All documents and materials are to be submitted with the permanent residency application, as well as any necessary fees. 

A Helpful Definition of Permanent Residency

A Helpful Definition of Permanent Residency

One of the aspects of United States immigration law that contributes to the confusion of understanding it is its terminology that has either changed with time or only serves to apply in certain cases; such is the nature of permanent residency. For instance, in the United States, the famed symbol of permanent residence, of being able to live and work beyond the terms of a temporary work visa is the Green Card
Not all nations have paths for permanent residence as an immigrant to the country. However, the United States, Canada, Mexico, Russia, China, Japan, the United Kingdom, Australia and the entirety of Scandinavia currently offer opportunities for permanent residence. Even when a nation does offer permanent residency to an immigrants, it may come with certain stipulations attached.
Theoretically, a nation could only offer evidence of permanent residence to those residents who are also members of the country or have claims to identity within the country as a product of their birth. Similar restrictions may also come to those who seek full citizenship in a foreign nation.
Permanent residency is not something one can utilize as a methods for defiance of immigration officials and local authorities. According to United States law, if one leave the country for an extended period of time, one can be considered to be waiving ones right to proof of permanent residence and their green card could thus become invalid, and should one choose to violate state or federal law and otherwise conduct oneself in a way that is contrary to American ideals as outlined in the Constitution and Declaration of Independence.
Permanent residence is not tantamount to citizenship. A green card might be a final destination for some immigrants, and realistically will take years to accomplish, if it happens at all. Still, citizenship confers more rights (and responsibilities) upon those who apply for it and are accepted than permanent residency does, and at least in the United States, the green card application process and the naturalization process are two separate routes. Again, despite the implied finality of “permanent residence,” citizenship is of the highest priority.

The Origins of the Term Green Card

The Origins of the Term Green Card

The United States Permanent Resident Card is the official designation for the documentation that a person holds when they are a certified lawful permanent resident of the United States of America. This permanent residency card is known by many different names, including what may be the most popular even though it is not the most technical, the green card.
Those who can claim ownership of the modern green card may not be aware of the genesis of this nickname and other alternative ways to refer to the United States Permanent Resident Card. After all, the permanent residency card that most people earn for their hard work these days is not literally green. Is the green card simply a misnomer or some sort of inside joke, or does this reference to an important part of an immigrant’s documentation actually have some basis in historical authenticity? In other words, was there ever such a thing as a green “green card
The Permanent Resident Card acquisition process manifested itself in the United States as a result of the Alien Registration Act of 1940Today, however, the United States Permanent Resident Card has returned to a off-white or a shade of white.
Whereas previous instances of the permanent residency card, especially when living up to their color of their familiar namesake, may have only contained a photo of the holder and some general identification information, today’s “green card” not only contains a photo of the holder, but also watermarks and other security measures, as well as fingerprint information for the permanent resident as registered with the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Permanent Residency Overview

Permanent Residency Overview

To some people, permanent residency may be equivalent to a green card, nothing more, nothing less. However, this is quite an unfortunate mindset to take, and on a number of levels at that. First and foremost, logistically, this assertion is of too narrow a focus.
While a green card does signify its holder is a permanent resident, the term “green card” is distinctly American. This is problematic when taking into consideration that permanent residency is not just an American institution, so it would be just as useful to equate permanent residency with a green card as it would to equate it with the Maple Leaf Card, Canada’s version of the Permanent Resident Card.
Additionally, however, this association of permanent residency with a green card seems contrary to the spirit of the concept. To lock in on the acquisition of a green card is to focus too strongly on permanent residency as some sort of destination, when really, permanent residency is only a stop on the way to naturalization and is by no means absolute, despite the name. Thus, greater thought must be given to permanent residency as a global process that, while subject to specific conditions, still affords those who attain considerable benefits.
In securing a visa to the United States, one is, by default, considered to be a future immigration applicant, and even with regards to a non-immigrant visa, there is room for its holder to become, in good time, a permanent resident. In analyzing permanent residency statistics for the U.S., referring to the overall figures for legal immigration is a prudent choice.
Using a confluence of information from the Department of Homeland Security and the United States Census Bureau, it has been determined that over 37 million people, or one-eighth of the population, is a foreign-born permanent resident or better. The country responsible for the highest amount of legal immigration is Mexico, which comes in at a 30% clip, and as a general trend, Latin AmericansAsians Changes in Department Issuance
Not only have immigration policies in America changed significantly over time, but just in the past decade, the very department which issues proof of permanent residency has itself changed, furthering reflecting the tendency towards flux with federal agencies. America’s lineage of immigration services began with The Office of Superintendent of Immigration, which was soon re-branded the Bureau of Immigration.
In contrast with today’s immigration practices, Bureau of Immigration Officials were tasked with on-site permits and denials of immigrants in famed hubs like Ellis Island. Later, the Bureau of Immigration gained naturalization services and morphed into the aptly-named Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization.
These two functions would, for a time, be split up, only to reunite under the Immigration and Naturalization Service, or INS. The INS served its namesake purposes for some sixty years before the attacks that occurred on September 11th saw the need for creation of yet another agency. The Department of omeland Security, which governs Citizenship and Immigration Services, now oversees permanent residency acquisition.