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Naturalization Citizenship

A Short Overview on Naturalization Citizenship

A Short Overview on Naturalization Citizenship

One of the great realities of the institutions of naturalization in the United States today is that regardless of where people are born, where their parents came from, or the color of their skin, they may become full citizens just like those people whose families have been in the country for generations. 
The naturalization process is generally reserved for those who entered the country legally. 
American immigration law provides some basic laws of naturalization. The applicant must live in the country for at least five years, without pause, to apply for naturalization. Exceptions are made, however, as applicants that are married to a legal citizen generally wait for a duration of three years and children are often naturalized alongside their parents. Naturalization laws surrounding marital applicants have become stricter in many regards, especially when considering past abuses of the system.
If the applicant is permitted to apply for naturalization, they will have to go through an interview and corresponding test. This examination includes basic knowledge of English and the American political system/history. In some cases, aside from swearing allegiance to the United States, a new citizen will have to forfeit their citizenship in their country of origin.
Process of Naturalization Naturalization StatisticsThough some legal and illegal immigrants give little credence to naturalization rates, statistics on the numbers of foreign-born individuals seeking American citizenship may yet be fruitful in helping gain support among Americans for immigration as a whole and deterring those non-Americans that believe there is little chance of them successfully coming to live permanently in the United States.
Overall, total immigrant numbers in America are approaching 40 million residents. In fact, 2008 saw over a million foreign-born applicants secure citizenship, many of them coming from Mexico, the Philippines and India. In other demographic terms, more women than men were naturalized, and most achieved this goal through petition by a family member or employment.  
Some rights of naturalized citizens may not be an apparent necessity for immigrants to the United States, but when considering their full implications, the move to apply for citizenship becomes more clearly valuable. The ability to vote in federal elections is an important symbol of the American people to choose someone who will represent their core interests.
The power to bring family to American shores on legal terms is vital for the preservation of family that is so important to the nation’s foundation. Having a travel visaNaturalization Lawyer
Though the naturalization process is given little thought by a number of Americans who became citizens by being born, it should be noted the processes of immigration and naturalization can be quite trying on the individual applicant. A good source of support, especially with regard to acquisition of citizenship, is a naturalization lawyer, who often prove well worth their fees.
In the pre-application stages, a naturalization lawyer can review a citizenship-seeker’s identification and records for any glaring weaknesses or red flags. The same, coincidentally, applies for the actual completion and sending of the N-400 Application for Naturalization to the Department of Homeland Security. On top of this, a naturalization lawyer makes for an excellent advocate for the applicant during his or her interview, especially if the legal professional perceives his/her client’s rights are being abused.
Benefits of Dual Citizenship
Rather than willingly acceding to a waiver of their original nationality, some people will actually try to preserve citizenship in two separate locations. Such is the essence of dual citizenship. In truth, being a citizen of multiple nations can work against a person, but in certain circumstances, it may also work to his or her advantage. If nothing else, dual citizenship may be a token of the emotional bond an individual shares with both lands.
Then again, having citizenship in a foreign country might be somewhat of a safeguard in the event of legal troubles or political imprisonment. More than that, it opens doors to employability and governmental benefits where only seasonal jobs and stipends may have previously applied. For those who can seek dual citizenship, the merits and limitations of adopting two nationalities must weighed in full before making any commitments.

How Does Dual Citizenship Work?

How Does Dual Citizenship Work?

The process of immigration is already a complicated one. As a general rule, a country will define citizenship based on an individual’s descent, place of birth, citizenship status of a husband or wife, or completing the process of legal immigration through naturalization. Dual citizenship is defined as the status of a person who is an actual citizen of two or more countries. 
An individual may be considered to be a citizen of a country for several reasons. If one was born on a territory that belongs to or is claimed by that particular country than that individual is considered to be a citizen. If one or both of a child’s parents were citizens of that country, the child is a citizen as well. If one uses the process of immigration to travel to the United States to marry an American citizen, they have a better chance of being quickly naturalized, although it takes much longer to accomplish these days due to rampant marriage fraud. If an individual’s parents or an individual obtained citizenship of a country by being using the immigration process to be legally naturalized, they are citizens. 
Since there can be several ways to obtain citizenship, either through immigration or birth right, it is possible for someone to be considered a citizen under the laws of two or more countries simultaneously. This is what is meant by dual citizenship. 
Citizenship of a country frequently indicated that an individual maintain responsibilities relating to taxes, military service, or travel restrictions. At times, countries apply their laws on individuals without regard to any dual citizenship rules that may apply. An individual holding dual citizenship may find that a country who has granted him dual citizenship in which he does not live, may expect them to pay taxes in addition to the taxes he already pays in their residing country. The individual may also have to follow rules restricting his travel access to certain countries. This could even include the other country that comprises their dual citizenship. 
American naturalization laws once mandated that an individual seeking citizenship must denounce former allegiances to other countries. This denouncement is no longer required, but at times, it may be heavily encouraged.
In general, those who hold a dual citizenship are not allowed special treatment by either of their two countries of citizenship. Each country usually treats the person as if he were a citizen of that country alone. Specifically, a dual citizen has more flexibility in their choice of where to work, live, and travel than those with citizenship to only one country. Any individual who wishes to obtain dual citizenship should carefully investigate the governing rules and regulations.

3 Steps to Apply for Naturalization Citizenship

3 Steps to Apply for Naturalization Citizenship

Citizenship in the United States confers a number of benefits on those who qualify as such distinguished residents of the country, such as the ability to run for public office, the ability to participate in voting in elections for public office, and the capacity to bring foreign family members and spouses over as legal immigrants. However, it is not as if citizenship comes with a permanent stamp to one’s forehead that allows anyone to see it and know he or she is a lawful citizen. Instead, the proof must be in the writing, or rather, the legal documentation.
A naturalization certificate is an important thing to be in the possession of a foreign-born person who becomes an American citizen through the naturalization application process. Naturalization documents must be processed and distributed by the federal government in order to ensure that these notices are delivered through the proper channels; specifically a naturalization certificate must be authorized by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services officials. Some requisites and prerequisites for proper approval during the naturalization application process include:
1. Specific qualifications – While children with a right to citizenship through birth gain citizenship by virtue of their place of birth or their parents identity as  U.S. citizens, still others gain citizenship under the Child Citizenship Act. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration guidelines have placed a list of detailed restrictions on who may and may not receive a naturalization certificate. Prior to completion of the naturalization application, residents must be able to prove beyond the shadow of a doubt that they are eighteen years or older, have held their marriageasylumrefugee
2. Filing of the naturalization application form with fees – With all phases of documentation of status, visa, green card, and naturalization, the proper application forms must be filled out in the right manner and the fees must be correctly and fully assessed. Often times, an immigration and naturalization 
3. The naturalization test/replacing documentation – To obtain a naturalization certificate, a final round of testing must be passed. The requirements are usually fairly minimal, however. To meet English standards, an applicant must usually be able to read and write one of three given sentences in English, pass the spoken interview completed with the submission of the naturalization application, and correctly answer six out of ten Civics questions. The process is certified completed upon a swearing of allegiance to the country, the oath of citizenship. In case the naturalization certificate is misplaced or otherwise indisposed, fees and Form N-565 for a replacement of the certificate must be submitted to Citizenship and Immigration officials.

Can the US Naturalize Illegal Immigrants?

Can the US Naturalize Illegal Immigrants?

Immigration and naturalization go hand in hand for many immigrants who wish to come to the United States legally. Immigrant naturalization can be a lengthy and difficult process depending on the circumstances of the particular individual. A foreign citizen or national can become a U.S. citizen through immigrant naturalization. As is the nature of citizenship, the immigrant must pledge allegiance to the United States. In return, the immigrant will be granted citizenship and will be eligible for nearly everything that citizens of the United States are guaranteed. 
 
 
Legal immigrant naturalization is a process that has many requirements in itself. One of them is that the applicant must enter the United States legall.
 
 
Other individuals, conversely, claim that amnesty provides incentive for further illegal immigration. In lieu of proposed legislation that has enumerated amnesty provisions and routes toward immigrant naturalization, detractors suggest guest worker programs if certain criteria are met, or more radically, mass deportation.  
 
 
Illegal immigrants have few options when considering the possibility of naturalization. Immigration and naturalization procedures are intended for those who enter the country legally and tries not to reward those that break the law. In certain cases, an illegal immigrant may be able to receive immigrant naturalization but if their true eligibility is verified, this may result in a  
Strong proponents and opponents of recent comprehensive reform attempts have argued heatedly about their implications and the effects a new bill will have on the United States immigrant naturalization process. Regardless, most would agree something needs to be done to the immigration and naturalization process to either naturalize the current illegal immigrant population or impose widespread deportations.
 

General Laws of Naturalization in the United States

General Laws of Naturalization in the United States

There are many naturalization laws and requirements that an immigrant seeking permanent citizenship must follow to achieve naturalization. Naturalization is a process that revolves around the acquisition of citizenship through specialized legal processes. To become a naturalized citizen of the United States, a foreign national first must meet several legal standards. Naturalization law has generally remained the same for the last couple of decades. 
Another naturalization law states that an immigrant applying for citizenship must be at least eighteen years old. Parents or adoptive parents are allowed to legally file applications on behalf of children under this age if they file a petition. Under naturalization laws, many immigrant children receive what is known as derivative citizenship with their parents. They are also usually exempt from the five-year residence requirement.  
The immigrant applying for naturalization must have the ability to understand, speak, read, and write basic English. There are times that older applicants may be exempt from this requirement if they have been in the United States for a long period of time and are in good standing. According to naturalization laws, applicants must also demonstrate basic knowledge of United States politics, government and history. An exam is administered to naturalization applicants. This exam must be passed for an immigrant to qualify for citizenship in the United States. If necessary, the applicant may retake the test. 
Another naturalization law revolves around the moral character of the applicant. Aliens are required to prove and show that they have good moral character. In addition, they must prove that they maintained this moral standard throughout their entire residence in the United States. This is a difficult standard to define. Naturalization laws generally define good moral character to be inconsistent with habitual drunkenness, gambling
Those applying for United States citizenship must show they are “attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well-disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States.”  This means that the immigrant must show that he or she generally agrees with American ideals and common way of life. The idea of “attachment to the Constitution” also includes a commitment to the Bill of Rights and a belief in the democracy that governs the United States political system. 
Lastly, according to naturalization law, the foreign applicant will most often have to pledge allegiance to the United States and sometimes renounce any other national allegiances.

The Process of Naturalization in the United States

The Process of Naturalization in the United States

Being naturalized is a process that immigrants who want to become legal United States citizens go through in order to obtain citizenship. Becoming naturalized can be a time consuming process, with many documents and requirements serving necessary. One of the biggest requirements is the naturalization interview that accompanies the citizenship test. The process of being naturalized is one that is open to all immigrants with legal permanent resident status who have lived in the United States for at least 5 years. If the immigrant applicant is married to an American citizen, this number drops to three years. 
The actual process of being naturalized begins with the submission of Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization) for immigrants over the age of 18. Immigrants under the age of 18, by American standards considered minors, often receive what is known as derivative citizenship through their parents. They are also usually exempt from the five-year residence requirement. Form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship) must be filled out for immigrants whose parents are United States Citizens and have already naturalized. If American parents are adopting a child from another nation, this is the process that is required for them to be legally naturalized. 
All naturalization forms are processed through United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The USCIS is a division of the Department of Homeland Security. At this point, in order to be naturalized, an thorough background check of the individual must be conducted. The information from this background check is then sent to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services to be verified. A successfully processed, clean background check is necessary to be legally naturalized. 
Once the background check returns with favorable results and the once the form has been processed, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services notifies the applicants of their scheduled naturalization interview. It is at this naturalization interview that the immigrant applicants will be questioned and tested. The tests that are given at this naturalization interview are used to verify the applicant’s ability to read, write, and speak English. The applicant is also tested on United States history, government, and politics. Knowledge of all of these things is required to be naturalized.
The process of naturalization requires a certain attention to detail and diligence on behalf of the applicant. The naturalization interview has become quite effective at weeding out fraudulent applications so it is extremely dangerous to attempt to lie or forge naturalization documents.

Important Naturalization Statistics Since 2011

Important Naturalization Statistics Since 2011

 

Immigrants who wish to apply for American citizenship have to go through the naturalization process. The naturalization process is a series of steps that an immigrant must take in order to be allowed full American citizenship.

 

American citizenship entails becoming a full member of American society and giving the individual the right to participate in any activity that an American born citizen can do. As illegal immigration in many aspects runs counter to the spirit of naturalization, the high frequency of success in naturalization should be emphasized to encourage legitimacy in living in the United States. The following are pertinent data related to the American naturalization process:

 

In 2006, statistics showed that the United States continuously accepts more immigrants as permanent residents than any other country in the world. In 2006, the number of immigrants in America totaled 38 million people.

 

The number of immigrants who apply for naturalization grows each year. In fact, in 2008, a new record was set: 1,046,539 immigrants underwent the naturalization process and achieved American citizenship. Of all the immigrants within the United States who underwent the naturalization process, the leading countries of origin were Mexico, India, and the Philippines. 

 

All naturalization process forms are checked through United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). American citizenship is harder than ever to gain since the September 11 attacks of 2001. With increased security demands due to terrorist attacks, an individual may have to go to greater lengths to achieve American citizenship. 

 

Since statistics are often delayed in being fully compiled, the most comprehensive breakdown of naturalization statistics comes from the year 2003 and earlier. There were just over seven hundred thousand individuals who went through the naturalization process and received American citizenship in said year. More females were naturalized than men and the largest portion of those naturalized did so through an immediate relative that had already received American citizenship. The other ways individuals were naturalized, in descending order, were family-sponsored preferences, employment preferences, diversity programs, refugee and asylum status, and all other routes to citizenship.

 

Naturalization, because it involves prior acquisition of a green card, is often a fairly good barometer of legal immigration trends. Nonetheless, sometimes, full citizenship is not realized by an immigrant to the United States, who may be content to only remain a permanent resident or who may fail to reach this goal in light of a criminal offense. While absolute naturalization figures are still vital in their own right, as time goes on, more and more attention must be paid to the relationship between legal naturalization and illegal habitation of American territory.  

4 Basic Rights of a US Citizen?

4 Basic Rights of a US Citizen?

For some immigrants to the United States, it may not be immediately clear why they should apply for citizenship. After all, illegal immigrants may be able to live in the country, evading prosecution or deportation for the entire duration of their stay. Furthermore, even for legal immigrants, there are fees and much preparation that comes along with becoming a naturalized citizen, so here are some of basic rewards:
 
 
 
1. VOTING: Voting in federal elections – For more jaded residents of the United States, wanting to apply for citizenship simply to be able to vote for President may seem like a wasted effort, especially if they believe that one vote does not make a difference. Recently, though, voter turnout among naturalized citizens has reached all-time highs. While this group may not be enough to carry a candidate nationally, at least in close races for individual states, blocs of naturalized voters may be enough to propel their candidate of choice to a majority victory. 
 
 
2. REUNITE WITH IMMEDIATE FAMILY: Bringing family members to the country – Clearly, for many immigrant laborers in the United States who are supporting family members abroad, this will be a great motivating factor for them to apply for citizenship. Rather than remain isolated from people they love waiting in foreign countries, the whole family unit can live and grow in America at the request of naturalized citizens. Furthermore, with a citizen parent as a sponsor, children will be able to become full citizens without the waits associated with adult applications for citizenship. 
 
 
3. US PASSPORT: Use a passport to travel – For travel to some countries, even in the short term, a visa will be needed by United States citizens to enter the country. For many others, especially in Europe, though, a European UnionSchengen
 
 
4. GOVERNMENT JOBS – many government jobs require US citizenship to apply. Carrying some of the best health and pension benefits, these jobs are very valuable and becoming a US citizen opens up doors for career growth in many fields..
 

How Can a Naturalization Lawyer Help?

How Can a Naturalization Lawyer Help?

For some, U.S. citizenship is an afterthought. By right of their birth in the United States, they are citizens and entitled to the standard rights and privileges that come along with being an American citizen as spelled out in the Constitution. However, for people who were not born in the United States and immigrated to this country from another jurisdiction, citizenship is not so automatic.
Many foreign-born individuals must first go through the naturalization process to attain full citizenship, and this process is often fraught with difficulties, especially since it is a multi-step process and applicants may not be aware of their full rights. Given this, a good idea for individuals looking to become citizens is to hire a naturalization lawyer who can aid them through their applications. The following are four hurdles in the naturalization process that 
Naturalization lawyers can help their clients overcome:
1. Review prior to formal application – Among the things naturalization officials will be looking for in a potential applicant is good moral character. In terms of logistics, this is tantamount to a check on the person’s immigration history, 
2. Background check – As with many applications for membership, application for U.S. citizenship involves fingerprinting/a biometrics exam and a background check. After one completes their N-400 form with their hired naturalization lawyer, the next stop on the path to naturalization is review of the client’s identifying information by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Once more, a fee is involved, of which naturalization lawyers should inform their clients. The applicant’s naturalization lawyer should also be up front about how precisely this information is being used by government officials, especially if the client is unfamiliar with law proceedings and apprehensive about being fingerprinted. 
3. Citizenship tests – Naturalization lawyers often will provide their most important service by accompanying their clients to the in-person tests that await them. These include a written exam in English and American Civics, a citizenship interview with an immigration official, and a citizenship oath by which the applicant pledges allegiance to the United States of America. Of course, naturalization lawyers should point out information services and review sessions prior to the exam. In addition, a naturalization lawyer may be present during the interview to address any further questions about his or her client’s eligibility. 
Obviously, naturalization lawyers are offering their services for a fee, which, along with those sums required for submission of the N-400 form and fingerprints may seem like a lot to a person seeking looking to be naturalized. Even so, the risk of not signing up with a naturalization lawyer could be substantially worse; the unsure, uninformed applicant could wind up with a revoked green card or face deportation if they try to apply for documents that require proof of citizenship. If looking to become a citizen, play it safe and enlist the help of a trustworthy naturalization lawyer. Their fee is worth the anxiety that will be saved.

Instant Benefits of Dual Citizenship

Instant Benefits of Dual Citizenship

 

With immigration to the United States, securing a U.S. Permanent Resident Card is often a sufficient result for foreign nationals. Even forfeiture of their citizenship in the nation from whence they came is a price they are willing to pay in order to be naturalized as an American with full rights and responsibilities. Even so, some people might want to retain their citizenship in one country and also acquire a new set of privileges in another. Some people, in fact, may be a citizen in multiple countries based on whom their parents are and where both the individual and their parents were born.

 

As the name implies, dual citizenship is the status of those who hold claims to citizenship in two separate nation-states. To be sure, dual citizenship has its drawbacks. Immigration officials, for example, might not let travelers pass if they possess passports from multiple countries, which might seem suspicious. Dual citizens, too, might even have to pay taxes in both jurisdictions. Just the same, there are a few positives to be found in conditions of dual citizenship:

 

On an emotional or spiritual level, citizenship at home may represent the strong bond that one has with his or her country, and citizenship in a foreign territory may come to be a badge of honor for that person after the hardships of the immigration process. In this way, dual citizenship is an important symbol of one's identity as a worldly individual, and as such, is important to try to preserve.

 

While dual citizenship may tend to complicate immigration and can result in surrender of one's status as a national in one of the two countries, in cases where a citizen runs into trouble on foreign soil amidst travel, diplomatic representatives of the citizen-state can offer their support and a limited amount of protection from harsh impositions of justice. In other words, this is not full diplomatic immunity, but it may be of substantial relief to some.

 

As noted, dual citizenship may require compound taxation be paid by the holder, but at the same time, there are benefits of being a citizen that may partially balance out these concerns. Generally, being a national of a nation will yield greater access to Social Security, health care, employability, and property rights.

 

The pros and cons of dual citizenship are often dependent on which the relationship of the two countries to which a person can claim citizenship. Before one attempts to gain full rights in a foreign jurisdiction through immigration, he or she should consider what exactly he or she might be sacrificing in doing so.