Home Immigration Polish Fugitive Deported for Extortion, Kidnapping, and Murder

Polish Fugitive Deported for Extortion, Kidnapping, and Murder

Polish Fugitive Deported for Extortion, Kidnapping, and Murder

Who is the Polish Fugitive Deported for Extortion, Kidnapping, and Murder?

On May 31, 2021, a Polish fugitive was deported from the United States and transferred to Polish authorities. The man, identified as Jaroslaw Jarzabek, was wanted for extortion, kidnapping, and murder charges in Poland.

Background of the Polish Fugitive

Jaroslaw Jarzabek was a member of a criminal gang involved in extortion, kidnapping, and murder in Poland. He fled the country in 2013 and went into hiding, evading the Polish authorities for several years.

In 2017, Polish authorities issued an arrest warrant for Jarzabek, who was suspected of being involved in the murder of a businessman in 2011. The victim was allegedly killed as a result of a business dispute with Jarzabek and his associates.

After several years on the run, Jarzabek was located in the United States and arrested by U.S. authorities in 2019, following a joint investigation with Polish law enforcement.

Deportation and Extradition of the Polish Fugitive

After his arrest, Jarzabek was held in U.S. custody pending deportation to Poland. He had been fighting extradition, but his appeals were denied, and he was finally transferred to Polish authorities on May 31, 2021.

Upon his return to Poland, Jarzabek will face trial for his alleged involvement in extortion, kidnapping, and murder.

Implications of the Deportation and Extradition

The deportation and extradition of Jaroslaw Jarzabek sends a clear message that the U.S. authorities will not tolerate criminals seeking refuge in the country. The case also highlights the importance of international cooperation in the fight against transnational crime.

The successful deportation and extradition of Jarzabek would not have been possible without the cooperation and coordination between U.S. and Polish law enforcement agencies.

Moving Forward: Addressing Transnational Crime

The deportation and extradition of Jaroslaw Jarzabek serve as a reminder of the need for international cooperation to combat transnational crime. Criminal organizations operate across national borders, making their activities difficult to track and prosecute.

It is important for law enforcement agencies around the world to work together to investigate and prosecute criminal activity, particularly in cases that involve transnational crime and fugitives seeking refuge in other countries.

Conclusion: The Importance of Collaboration in Combatting Transnational Crime

The deportation and extradition of Jaroslaw Jarzabek highlight the importance of international collaboration in combatting transnational crime. Criminals seeking refuge in other countries must be held accountable for their actions, and law enforcement agencies must work together to bring them to justice.

The successful operation between U.S. and Polish law enforcement agencies to deport and extradite Jarzabek serves as an example of what can be achieved through international cooperation in the fight against crime.


On October 16, 2012, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that Dariusz Gordziejczyk was turned over to Polish law enforcement because he is wanted for extortion, kidnapping, and attempted murder in his home country.  The deportation was handled by the ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO).

The original arrest warrant was issued for Gordziejczyk on September 14, 2001 by the Bialystok Criminal Court for the charges listed above.  The arrest warrant stated that Gordziejczyk and co-defendants beat a man in 1999 in order to extort money, but the man eventually escaped.  Gordziejczyk was sentenced to two years in prison for the crime.

Gordziejczyk and co-defendants also kidnapped a man in 1999.  They drove the man to a patch of woods, covered him in gasoline, and threatened to light him on fire unless he turned over his BMW.  He was sentenced to four years of this crime as well, but he fled to the United States before he was supposed to serve his prison time.

He fled to the United States in February of 2006 on a visitor’s visa, and he stayed in the United States after his visa expired in February of the following year.

ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) received a tip from the FBI that Gordziejczyk was believed to be living in Chicago.  The HSI special agents found Gordziejczyk on July 12, 2011 in River Grove, Illinois.

Gordziejczyk was ordered to leave the country on March 19, 2012.  He appealed the sentence in July of 2012, but the Board of Immigration Appeals denied the appeal.  He will begin serving his sentence immediately.

Ricardo Wong, the ERO Chicago field office director, stated: ‚ÄúThis individual tried to escape justice in Poland for the crimes he committed there.¬† On a daily basis, ICE protects public safety by arresting and removing international fugitives who pose a threat to our communities.‚ÄĚ

Source: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement