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Californians for Population Stabilization on Immigration

Californians for Population Stabilization on Immigration

The so-called bipartisan “Gang of Eight” senators has introduced legislation, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, that they say will reform the immigration system. This legislation promises, among other things, to tighten border security and controversially grant legal status to the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States.

(More on  News at LAWS.com, contact Adam for interviews “adama@laws.com”)

Supporters of this bill, S. 744, say that it will greatly improve a dysfunctional immigration system. However, a conservative backlash against it is taking place in the House. The backlash is specifically against the provision to grant a path to citizenship to the 11 million undocumented immigrants. Those who oppose this reform in the House are hoping to kill the bill through a strategy of delay and dismemberment. However, a bipartisan group of House members is working behind the scenes to draft a bill that does will have a path to citizenship.

The debate on immigration is certainly divisive in the United States. However, a recent Pew Research poll has shown that perhaps the Gang of Eight is out of touch with what Americans truly want in terms of immigration reform. This poll reveals that 55 percent of Americans oppose granting citizenship to those 11 million undocumented immigrants.

Californians for Population Stabilization (CAPS) is a nonprofit organization that aims to preserve the future of the state of California through the stabilization of the state’s population. CAPS aims to educate the public about the negative impacts of overpopulation, and has given the issue of immigration special attention by sponsoring media and public awareness campaigns and working with lawmakers to promote responsible immigration policies since most of the United States’ population growth and that of California was a result of immigration.

The following is an interview with Joe Guzzardi, Senior Writing Fellow at CAPS, on his views on the immigration reform legislation.

How do you feel about the immigration-reform bill being debated in the Senate?

Right now, the dynamic of the debate has shifted dramatically from the time before the bill (S. 744) was introduced, when the Gang of Eight and their media supporters dominated the debate by falsely promising that it was going to be an overhaul that would feature security measures and would make sure that all of the amnesty illegal immigrants would pay taxes and go to the back of the line.

Now that the people have had the time to read the bill there is a growing realization that none of the promises are included in the bill! There is no increase in border security, there is no way amnestied illegal immigrants are going to pay back taxes or fees or anything else promised! Remember that Senator Marco Rubio promised that border security "triggers" would be in place before any illegal immigrants were legalized. We now know and Rubio admits that this is not the case.

So 11 million illegal immigrants will be instantly work authorized and compete with 22 million unemployed or under-employed Americans. Over the first decade after passage, as many as 33 million new green cards could be issued. Outrageous on both counts. And we also know that, according to the Heritage Foundation, the legalizing illegal immigrants would cost American taxpayers $6.3 trillion. More outrage that the already beleaguered taxpayer—who by the way opposes amnesty— would have to fund. It's important to remember that the amnesty legislation is strictly Beltway-driven and has little support from grassroots Americans.

What the Gang of Eight had hoped to be a "yea" slam dunk vote is now highly doubtful. Rubio himself indicated it's questionable that, as written, S. 744 would pass the Senate and added that he doesn't expect it would pass the House. So, to answer your question succinctly, I think the bill is terrible in every respect and I put its chances of passage at 50/50 at best.

What are some of the changes you would like to see happen to U.S. immigration policy?

I would personally like to see things that would really make a difference in immigration reform in the United States! I would certainly end the way the anchor baby clause is wrongly interpreted, which is a huge incentive for illegal immigration, certainly into border states like California and Texas. I would like to see automatic citizenship ended,  I would like to see much more secure and extended fencing along the border, I would like to see employers who hire illegal immigrants punished meaningfully with jail time and significantly fined, and not given token fines.

I want mandatory E-Verify, and an end to the idiotic Diversity Visa. Honestly, most of the other dozens of visas are questionable at best. We saw in Boston an example of the rampant abuse of the student visa and U.S. asylum policy. Include as questionable the fiancée visa ("K"), the religious worker visa ("R"), and non-immigrant worker visas like the H-1B visa.

Look at the abuse the K visa has set off—hundreds of for-profit Internet sites unscrupulously matching aging American citizens with young women from all over the world. The women are eager to marry someone they hardly know for in exchange for legal U.S. residency

Except in extraordinary circumstances, the visas serve little positive purpose and all of them encourage immigration abuse, the last thing we need.

Do you think it would be a better policy to change our immigration system so that more highly-skilled workers are permitted rather than low-skilled workers?

If there are going to be changes in the visa system, and certainly there are areas where changes could be made that would be positive for the country, I certainly agree that people with higher skills and more education should be at the top of the list of anybody who comes into the United States.

But the idea of more visas for low-skilled workers is an unfunny Chamber of Commerce joke! You have 20-22 million Americans that are either unemployed or underemployed, and of those 22 million, a significant portion of them have little education and would do those kinds of jobs if they were made available to them. So yes, if you were to prioritize the different visa categories, I would agree that the first people who should be considered are people who have high education levels and who are probable entrepreneurs, and who would start businesses that would employ Americans.

What are some of the accomplishments of Californians for Population Stabilization?

CAPS was formed in 1986 and has been in operation continuously since then. It has always had a strong environmental perspective and wants Californians as well as the other 49 states' residents to be more environmentally aware. CAPS helps Californians realize that what was once a beautiful and unspoiled state has suffered significant changes in its environmental quality for numerous reasons, including high levels of immigration and also high birth rates among some immigrant families.

We believe more people equals more cars, more housing, more schools, more hospitals – all those things need to be built to accommodate higher population. When houses etc. are built, land—which in many parts of California has been agricultural land— is lost forever. The term generally used to describe the phenomena is "sprawl." So immigrants come to the United States and to California not to live the way they did in their home country, but to become consumers and excessive consumerism is bad for the environment.

Secondly, one of the things CAPS has done is that we have been active in helping to block previous amnesties: the 2006 and 2007 amnesties. And we have worked tirelessly to block the DREAM Act in all of its different manifestations! The DREAM Act was introduced 10 years or so ago, and it has been an ongoing but successful to keep the DREAM Act from passing.

Last year we started an outreach program among California colleges and universities to get students to submit essays on why preserving California and its environment is important to all California residents, but especially important to the younger generation! We had tremendous response.

If this legislation does pass, what would be the next step for Californians for Population Stabilization?

I'm confident legislation, as currently written, will not pass. If it passes the Senate, it is not going to pass the House. Nevertheless, what I foresee is endless weeks of hashing and rehashing immigration in both the House and the Senate.

In other words, the issue is not going to go away. And even if S. 744 does pass, for immigration advocates, it still won't be enough. There will be something out there where they will say, “it is great that the bill passed, but it didn't do enough for this or that particular group.”

Remappingthedebate.org, for example, went to pro-immigration advocates and asked at what point they would agree that there is enough immigration to the United States. None of them were willing to answer the question. They wouldn't name a number they would identify as "enough" and agree that the immigration policy in the United States is sufficiently inclusive to end their lobbying efforts. The reason they wouldn't answer is that they want unlimited immigration to the U.S.

CAPS is committed to fighting and winning the fight for a better and fairer America for all Americans no matter how long that battle may take.

For more information on Californians for Population Stabilization, please visit their page. For more information on immigration laws and news, please visit our Immigration Laws Page.

Interviewed with Joe Guzzardi of Californians for Population Stabilization, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is agency installed by the government as a vehicle for protecting public safety and national security through the means of investigation services and the upholding of federal laws regarding customs, immigration, border control, and trades.
Under the the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency there are specific sectors or offices devoted to monitoring and caring policies in conjunction with specified nature. These offices are: Office of Public Affairs, State and Local Coordination, Principal Legal Adviser, Detention Policy and Planning, Congressional Relations, Professional Responsibility, and the Reporting Operations Center
Each sector is important when it comes to making sure U.S. immigration policy is being implemented and protected; the Detention Policy and Planning office is instrumental in refining and creating policies that work fairly to punish employers who do not adhere to immigration policy, and to those employees who are working without the proper credentials or are in the country illegally. 
Another important sector is the Reporting Operations Center; this is the area which houses the National Incident Response Unit; these are the individuals who help create policies and prepare to handle immediate danger that threatens U.S. immigration policy, or the borders of the land. Overall, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency has been a continuous progression of policies and implementation in order to procure safety and rights for the individuals of the United States.

Important Statistics on Illegal Immigration

Important Statistics on Illegal Immigration

Out of the countries in the world, it may be argued that the United States currently has the most illegal immigration. The illegal immigration  statistics provided by the United States Center for Immigration Studies shows that there are approximately 12 million immigrants in the country.
However, illegal immigration statistics will sometimes provide for a range of 7 to 20 million illegal immigrants currently in the United States. Illegal immigration facts will show that the majority of the illegal immigrants in the country are typically from Latin American countries, particularly Mexico.
Illegal immigration statistics report that over 50% of the illegal immigrants in the United States are from Mexico, with over 20% of all illegal immigrants hailing from other Latin American countries. Other nations reported substantially lower numbers, with Asian countries representing for the third largest figure, being only 13% of illegal immigrant population. 
Illegal immigration facts in regard to the United States will show that the majority of the population of illegal immigrants is concentrated in the state of California. Illegal immigration statistics state that nearly three million illegal immigrants reside in California. Second to California is the state of Texas, with about 1.5 million illegal immigrants total.
Such illegal immigration facts will allude to the conclusion that bordering states with Mexico are most susceptible to having larger illegal immigration populations. However, other states such as Illinois and New York also house a large population of illegal immigrants, which proves to show that illegal immigrants will move to other states further beyond the border. 

U.S. and Mexico Begin Humane Repatriation

U.S. and Mexico Begin Humane Repatriation

 

On October 2, 2012, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Mexican Ministry of the Interior announced the start of a project called the Interior Repatriation Initiative, or IRI.  The new initiative plans to “provide humane, safe and orderly repatriation” of Mexican citizens who returned to the country.  The new initiative plans to return the Mexican citizens to their hometowns—even in the interior of the country—instead of simply returning them to towns on the U.S. and Mexican border.  
 
ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations now plans to transport Mexican citizens via charter aircraft who traveled from the interior of Mexico.  The chartered flights will fly to Mexico City, and then the Government of Mexico will provide ground transportation to their hometowns.  
 
Many of the removed Mexican citizens are not from the northern border towns where they were historically repatriated.  When the U.S. government would repatriate the Mexican citizens to the border towns, they had a higher chance of entering the United States again, joining criminal organizations, or even losing their life.  
 
ICE Director John Morton states, “IRI reflects our commitment and ongoing bilateral effort with the government of Mexico to ensure strong, humane and effective enforcement of both nations’ immigration laws.  This initiative will better ensure that individuals repatriated to Mexico are removed in circumstances that are safe and controlled.”  
 
The Undersecretary of Mexico’s population, migration and religious affairs, Gustavo Mohar Betancourt, stated, “This initiative aims to collaborate and fully support border state authorities by reducing the number of Mexican nationals who are repatriated to the border region.  The newly repatriated, often with no means to return home, are susceptible to becoming a part of criminal organizations as a means of survival.” 
 
The first flight for repatriation occurred on October 2 from the El Paso International Airport, and the flight contained 131 Mexican nationals.  
 
Source: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Woman Charged for Smuggling Illegal Aliens

Woman Charged for Smuggling Illegal Aliens

On October 5, 2012, the San Diego FBI Office announced that Maria Guerrero of Chula Vista, California, was arrested by agents of the Border Corruption Task Force.  She was charged with alien smuggling, and the specific charge is “bringing in illegal aliens for financial gain” under U.S.C. §1324(a)(2)(B)(ii).  

 
The arrest of Guerrero was an extension of an investigation by the Border Corruption Task Force that focused on Gerardo Rodriguez, Vanessa Moya, and Hector Rodriguez, a Customs Border Protection Officer.  
 
The three previous defendants were arrested on July 13, 2012 along with 14 illegal aliens.  The three defendants were smuggling illegal aliens into the United States from Mexico.  According to the FBI, Hector Rodriguez informed the other defendants about his work schedule at the San Ysidro Port of Entry, including the lane number where he was performing inspections.  
 
The other two defendants would then drive the vehicles through Hector’s vehicle inspection lane.  The FBI reports that the three defendants received thousands of dollars for smuggling fees.  Hector Rodriguez also received rent payments, the use of expensive cars, and more.  
 
Guerrero was charged for her role in the July 13 crossing.  About one minute after Moya crossed the border, Guerrero then drove a 2005 Toyota Corolla through the San Ysidro Port of Entry.  Agents believe Guerrero’s timing indicates that she was going to meet with the Moya to initiate the release of the illegal aliens.  It is believe she was going to receive thousands in smuggling fees.  
 
Guerrero is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.  She made her first court appearance on Friday, October 5 before a United States Magistrate Judge.  
 
The Border Corruption Task Force is made up of the FBI, the Customs and Border Protection-Internal Affairs, Customers and Border Protection-Field Operations, Border Patrol, the TSA, and the DEA.  
 
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation

Identification

Identification

What to Know About Forms of Identification
In order for an individual to explain or prove his or her identity, age, reside, or other important personal details, some sort of identification document is necessary. The most common way to prove an established identity is by the use of an identity card or license, although other official government documents can be used, such as identity papers, passports, or a driver’s license. 
In the United States, the most common forms of identification of legal citizens are include identification in card form (such as Passport Cards, driver’s licenses, and identification cards), passports, social security cards, birth certificates, and others.
A Driver’s License as Identification
While driver’s licenses are technically provided with the intent of allowing an individual to drive, it is common practice in all states and U.S. territories to use a driver’s license as an official form of a identification card. This is because a driver’s license is carried at all times when operating a vehicle and is asked for by law enforcement. Furthermore, a driver’s license provides photo identification, signature, and certain identifying information such as name, date of birth, or physical features.
States also provide identification cards that are almost exactly like a driver’s license, but do not permit the privilege of driving. They do however contain the same personal information as a driver’s license.
These two forms of card identification are accepted and considered valid in other states as well as U.S. territories. Furthermore, many other countries outside of the United States will accept a driver’s license or state identification card as a legitimate identity document.
Both driver’s licenses and identification cards can be obtained through the Department of Motor Vehicles of the respective state. The only exception to this is that Kentucky and Hawaii do not have a state Department of Motor Vehicles, but instead have an agency at the county level. 
A driver’s license contains the following identifying information:
Name
Address of primary residence
Physical Appearance (weight, height, hair and eye color)
Date of Birth
Photograph
A Passport as Identification
A passport can be obtained in the United States through the United States Department of State. Passports can be issued to citizens of the U.S. as well as non-citizen nationals. Passports are usually issued in booklet form, but more recently have become available in a limited card form as well.
The primary function of a passport is to allow an American to travel throughout the world, although sometimes a visa may be needed in addition to the passport. However, because passports contain may details about an individual’s identity, they are often used as a form of identification. This often happens with non-US citizens who use their passport from their country of origin, or individuals who do not have a driver’s license.
A passport contains the following identifying information:
Full name
Date and location of birth
Gender
Nationality
Photograph
Other forms of Identification
There are many other forms of identification that can be obtained in the United States. Some of these include the following:
Birth certificate
Social Security Card
Certificate of U.S. Citizenship
Immigration documents
Certificate of Naturalization
Passport card
School ID card
Employee ID card
Credit and debit cards
Proof of insurance
Library card
Membership cards

Identification Cards

Identification Cards

The Facts about Identification Cards


Identification cards are used for individuals who either do not or cannot drive, and therefore do not hold a driver’s license. The purpose of the identification card is to provide a form of identification that can be used to verify an individual’s age, although it can go further by verifying a signature or state residency.
It is very useful for an individual without a license to have an identification card. Having one can allow the individual to view R-rated movies, purchase alcohol and tobacco, board a plane, cash a check, enter bars and night clubs, registering to vote, becoming an organ donor, or check into a hotel without needing a license. 
The individuals who usually obtain an identification card include: 
Individuals who do not have a driver’s license due to personal preference
Individuals who do not have a driver’s license because of age restrictions
Individuals who have had their driver’s licenses suspended
A State identification card is usually almost nearly identical to a driver’s license, although somewhere on the card it will state that the card is just for identification purposes only. This can also apply to age-dependent licenses, where a 21 and over ID may have a certain orientation or color that corresponds to that of a driver’s license for an individual who is over 21.
A state may also provide different types of identification cards. For example, Illinois allows the issuing of three different identification cards. They are for individuals over 65 (a Senior Card), an individual under 65, and an individual who is disabled.
How to Obtain an Identification Card
For all states, identification cards can be obtained through the local Department of Motor Vehicles or equivalent driver agency. All states require certain pieces of information and documents in order to issue an identification card to an individual. In order to receive an identification card, an individual may have to show:
Proof of identity
Proof of age
Proof of residence (particularly residence in that state)
Signature
Valid social security number or social security ineligibility
Lawful Status


What Else to Know About Identification Cards
Depending on the state, there are different procedures involving identification cards. Typically, states charge between $10-20 for an identification card, but the prices can heavily vary. For example, an identification card costs only $8 in Montana, but costs $44.50 in Oregon.
If an identification card is lost or stolen or has expired, each Department of Motor Vehicles or equivalent agencies has certain procedures set in order to replace the identification card. Depending on the situation and state, there can be a replacement or renewal fee that is similar to the cost of initially getting the card. It is usually necessary to bring the forms of identification and proof of information during these circumstances.

Becoming a United States Immigrant

Becoming a United States Immigrant

Becoming a United States Immigrant


An immigrant is an individual who comes to a new country with the intention of leaving the old country and permanently settling in the one. 
The decision for an immigrant to come to the United States to permanent live here is a very important and complicated decision. It is necessary for a potential immigrant to understand whether they are allowed to immigrate into the United States, what sort of immigrant visa they will require, the necessary forms for the process, and the steps of obtaining an immigrant visa. 
In order to be eligible to apply and obtain an immigrant visa, a potential immigrant must have a sponsor by a citizen who is a U.S. relative, a prospective employer, or a lawful permanent resident. This sponsor must act with the U.S. Citizen & Immigration Services as the beneficiary of the approved petition. Sponsors who are within the United States must file the following forms:


For US citizens or lawful permanent sponsors
Form I-130
Petition for Alien Relative
For potential employer sponsors
Form I-140
Petition for Alien Worker
Under certain circumstances, an immigrant petition can be filed outside of the US. Within countries that have Citizen & Immigration Services offices, it is possible to file a petition through a US embassy or consulate. These offices accept the following forms:
Petition for Alien Relative (Form I-130): Applicable if the petitioner is a legal resident within the consular district and the beneficiary is most likely to be able to stay in the country for the typical amount of time it requires for visa processing. The petitioner must still be a citizen of the United States.
Petition for Amerasian, Widow/er, or Special Immigrant (Form I-360): Applicable when filed by widower or widow of a deceased U.S. citizen
Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative (Form I-600): Applicable with an approved Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition (Form I-600A)
Filing any of these petition forms requires legal residence within the consular district of the United States consulate or embassy for at least the past 6 months. In certain rare situations, a consular officer may consider approving petition even without the petitioner having prior legal residence for 6 months.
One the immigrant petition has been approved, the next step is preliminary processing of the following items at the National Visa Center:
Necessary documents such as birth certificates, marriage/divorce certificates, and police reports
Affidavit of Support
Medical Exam or panel physician information
Immigrant Interviews
The Immigrant interview is an important part of the immigration process. Once a potential immigrant has a scheduled interview with the National Visa Center, the applicant should then take the following steps:
Carefully look over the information about the time, date, and place of the interview.
Prepare for the medical exam.
Make sure that all necessary original documents are available for the interview.
Get the photographs that are required.
Look over the U.S. Consulate/embassy interview guidelines.
Look over the important visa interview notices.
Look over the immigrant visa interview FAQ.

How to Use DS 160 Form

How to Use DS 160 Form

How to Use DS 160 Form


DS 160 Form is the Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application from the Bureau of Consular Affairs of the United States Department of State. DS 160 Form is a completely integrated online application form that can be used in order to collect the needed application information from an individual hoping to obtain a nonimmigrant visa that can be used for temporary travel to the United States.
DS 160 Form is submitted to the Department of State website electronically by using the internet. The Bureau of Consular Affairs officers receive the information shown on the DS 160 Form and use it to process the individual’s visa application. The DS 160 Form along with the personal interview are the determination factors in whether an applicant is eligible for a nonimmigrant visa. 
For all nonimmigrant visa categories, applicants need to submit a completed DS 160 Form online through the Nonimmigrant Visa Application, with the exception of individuals who are applying for K visas. These applicants must use the DS 156 Form, or the Nonimmigrant Visa Application.
An applicant will need these things filling the DS 160 Form online:
Digital picture of the visa applicant. Alternatively, an applicant can bring a printed picture to the visa interview at the consulate.
Which specific consulate the interview will be at.
Reliable internet connection.
Passport details including name, date of birth, issue and expiration date of the passport, and the passport number.
Family information of applicant such as name of parents, their income, mailing address, work address, and more.
Address of the location in the United States where the applicant will stay.
Name and address of any relatives in the United States, if applicable.
For United States residents, the resident’s social security number and tax ID number.
Date of the most recent travel to the United States, if applicable.
It is important to give truthful and correct information on the DS 160 Form. All answers have to be in English can only use English characters, with the exception of the space for full name of the applicant in his or her native alphabet. Special characters like ñ, ü, or ç are not understood by the system. 


Other tips for filling out the DS 160 Form:
If there is no website activity for 20 minutes, the online application process session will expire and the information entered will not be recovered.
Review the information entered by the applicant for accuracy.
Print the confirmation page that shows up after submitting the application.
Make sure to bring the printed confirmation page during all steps of the visa application process.

How to Use Form I-751

How to Use Form I-751

How to Use Form I-751


Form I-751 is a government form from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services for the Petition to Remove the Conditions of Residence. The purpose of Form I-751 is to give a conditional resident who got their status through the marriage of either a permanent resident or a United States citizen the opportunity apply to remove the conditions placed on his or her residence. After the petition is approved, the individual is given a 10-year permanent resident card.
Specifically, a Form I-751 is usually used by an individual who got a Green Card through marriage of a citizen or permanent resident and came to the United States on a K1 visa who most likely got a Conditional Permanent Resident card which was valid for two years. Once this conditional two-year period is up, the permanent residence status expires automatically and the applicant may be deported or removed from the country.
In order to avoid these actions, an applicant should file Form I-751 90 days or less before the expiration of the conditional residence. Once the condition is approved, the conditional status is then removed and the applicant will receive a Permanent Resident card that is then valid for ten years. Form I-751 should not be filed before the 90-day window because the application will be returned.
If still married, the applicant can file Form I-751 jointly with the spouse who is a United States citizen or permanent resident through whom the applicant obtained the conditional permanent status. If the applicant has any dependent children on the K-2 visa who also obtained their status for conditional permanent when they entered the United States within a 90-day period of the applicant’s arrival, their names and A-numbers can be included in Part 5 of the petition form.
If the children conditional statuses were obtained after the 90 day period from the applicant obtained or adjusted their status or in the case that the conditional permanent parent passes away, the children must file Form I-751 separately from the parent in order to remove the conditional status.
If the applicant, the conditional permanent resident does not file jointly, he or she can file for a waiver, assuming:
The applicant can show that proof of entering the marriage with good intentions and honesty, but the spouse subsequently passed away.
The applicant entered the marriage in good faith, but the marriage resulted in an annulment or divorce.
The applicant entered the marriage in good faith and is still married, but the applicant has subjected to cruelty or has been battered by the United States citizen or permanent resident spouse or the termination of the status and removal from the country would result in some sort of extreme hardship.
In circumstances where an applicant requests a waiver, proof is very important.
A complete application should include the following:
A signed and completed Form I-751.
A front and back copy of the applicant’s Conditional Green Card
Two passport-style photographs for the applicant as well as any children on the application.
Form FD-258 for two completed fingerprint cards for the applicant and any children on the application.
Evidence of a bonafide marriage entered in good faith and honesty, such as birth certificates of children born In the marriage, joint assets, sworn statements of at last two people, mortgage or lease contracts showing joint occupancy.
Filing Fee.