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What are Refugee Camps?

The Issue of Iraqi Refugees

The Issue of Iraqi Refugees

Iraqi refugees in the modern world are most likely those individuals who have either left or been forced to leave their home country of Iraq. Most often, the cause of Iraqi refugees leaving Iraq has been some form of war within their home country. For example, many Iraqi refugees left Iraq during the Persian Gulf War of 1990, and many more have left recently in the current Iraq War. Current estimates put the number of Iraqi refugees in the world at somewhere between 1.6 million and 2.2 million, depending upon the source of information, with the vast majority of current Iraqi refugees having left Iraq relatively recently.
This is a particularly significant problem facing the modern world, as all of these Iraqi refugees may not have anywhere else to go, and instead they are often being put into refugee camps which can be dangerous and unsanitary, especially for refugee children. Indeed, refugee children are very often underfed and unable to gain access to drinking water which is clean and safe to drink, meaning that refugee children are often very much at risk for significant diseases and other problems.
One of the biggest dilemmas currently existent regarding Iraqi refugees is that the vast majority of Iraqi refugees must go to countries within the areas around Iraq. Very few Iraqi refugees and refugee children have been allowed into the Untied States of America, depending upon information sources. For example, one source claims that America has only admitted 800 Iraqi refugees since the beginning of the new Iraq War. A large number of Iraqi refugees have instead been forced into Jordan, Syria, and Egypt.

The Issue of Bhutanese Refugees

The Issue of Bhutanese Refugees

Bhutan is a small country located in south Asia. It is bordered by the People’s Republic of China, and by the Republic of India, with smaller states in between it and some of the other close neighbors. In terms of Bhutanese refugees, Bhutan has been one of the most significant sources of refugees in the entire world to date. Some statistics show that over a sixth of Bhutan’s population has become Bhutanese refugees since 1991, when significant numbers of Bhutan’s population are believed to have been expelled from the country by the Bhutanese government.
This is not known for certain, however, and it is debated between many who believe that the expulsion was planned and intended by the Bhutanese government, and others who believe that it was the reaction of insurgents within Bhutan, or the result of Nepalese citizens pretending to be Bhutanese refugees in order to receive aid and housing.
The Bhutanese refugees currently known to be housed in Nepal number close to 105,000, and have been in such refugee camps for around 15 years, some ever since the original expulsion. The expulsion of Bhutanese refugees primarily targeted the Lhotshampas people of Bhutan.
In general, Bhutan began to attempt to assert the dominance of Bhutanese culture within the country as something separate from the culture of Nepal, particularly as many Nepalese citizens had been illegally immigrating into Bhutan and had been failing to pick up any important elements of Bhutanese culture. As such, Bhutan conducted a census, which is the point at which most people attribute the departure of the Bhutanese refugees from Bhutan. The exact status of these Bhutanese refugees is still in debate, as they are still not allowed back into Bhutan, and most have not been yet resettled.

Who is a Refugee?

Who is a Refugee?

Refugees are those individuals who are no longer living within their home nations because they have some credible fear of living in their home nations, or they are otherwise unable to do so. A refugee is not necessarily the same as an asylum seeker, as an asylum seeker generally is attempting to create a new home in another country, while a refugee will ostensibly return to his or her home once the condition which required his or her departure no longer exists.