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Effects of Deportation

A Look at Family Relationships and Deportation

A Look at Family Relationships and Deportation

Any immigrant can be ordered with deportations, meaning an order to return to their country of origin. This possibility is higher when the immigrant in question is an illegal immigrant. Deportations are a constant threat to illegal immigrants and for those individuals with families, the effects of a deportation present even further difficulties.
Family relationships are considered to be the most important bonds that a human being can forge with another. When a legal or illegal immigrant is deported back to their country of origin and leaves behind their family in the United States, the hurt and pain can  be devastating. However, just because an illegal immigrant is deported does not mean that their family is required to go with them back to their country of origin. Deportations may affect the entire family, but they do not necessarily cause the entire family unit to leave the United States.
Many illegal immigrants who are deported have their families remain behind in the United States for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are financial in nature. If the remaining family members are able to get a decent job and plan-out a decent living, then it may be possible for the deported individual to receive financial help even after they are back in their home country.
Man–both legal and illegal immigrants–send a good portion of their income back to their country of origin so that their family members can support themselves more comfortably then they would have been able to. Many immigrants also come to America so that they are able to save up enough money to return to their home country one day and purchase land or start a business. Despite any deportations, the extradited family member may wish for their family to continue to work toward this dream.
Other reasons that a legal or illegal immigrant will leave their family in the United States are emotionally based. It is a general opinion that families should not be separated, but many immigrants who came to the United States in search of a better life still want their family to be able to pursue that lifestyle. There are also legal reasons for a deported legal or illegal immigrant to want their family to remain in the United States. With family in the United States, it may be easier for the immigrant to regain entrance to the United States, either legally or illegally.
Deportations in the family present specific issues when considering children. If parents are served a divorce order, the issue of what to do with children can confound the strongest families. If the option to leave the child with a relative does not exist, many consider allowing the children to enter a facility catered to their need. This will often allow the child to stay in the country, a notion often considered if the deportation would result in returning to an unsafe area or country.
The reasons for the greater ease of access may vary, but usually the financial benefits of the family members who didn’t face deportations are a large factor. Higher income means a higher chance of being able to legally fight for a chance to return to the United States. However, higher income for illegal immigrants may also mean that they have more resources at their disposal to use to sneak back into the United States undetected.

Effects of Deportation on the Family

Effects of Deportation on the Family

Certainly, illegal immigrants who are deported or are sitting in a detention center awaiting deportation stand to be deeply affected by a decision against them in an immigration court. Communication across international lines may be costly, and may be downright impossible for those who are detained. What’s worse, concerning detentions, these terms of imprisonment may last months to years. In the event important decisions need to be made within a family, calls for deportations will hinder the ability to move forward. Moreover, some families may be forced to move on without the detainee/deportee.
Monetarily, the deportation of some illegal immigrants may be a major detriment to some families. Often times, an individual who is awaiting deportation will the “breadwinner” who earns the bulk of the family’s income, and the rest of the family will be not be able to get by without those wages. This also applies to any family or extended family in an immigrant’s home country depending on the money he or she sends. 
Emotions, of course, are not to be disregarded. The emotional bond of the family, meanwhile, is the most critical of all if they are to survive as a unit. In the absence of a parent, a child may grow depressed, fearful, angry and otherwise unable to cope. Worse yet, if both parents are illegal immigrants and get deported, their deportations can essentially turn a child into an orphan overnight. Most people would agree a child’s biological parents are an important influence and source of support for the child, so to suddenly take them away could very well prove devastating to the young boy or girl.
Certainly, American finances and control of the borders must be bolstered. However, for a nation that prides itself on its devotion to the concept of family, deportation is something that must be measured carefully before any sweeping reforms or large-scale deportation orders are authorized.