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Deportation Statistics

Statistics on Country Related Deportation

Statistics on Country Related Deportation

For the most part, immigration statistics, both legal and illegal, are rough estimates. Still, immigration authorities release a series of illegal immigration statistics annually. For instance, illegal immigration statistics show that there are about 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States, though the number is said by some to be much higher due to secrecy when reporting on such matters. 
Since 1997, the number of immigrants deported has steadily increased; predictably, the greatest jump was a 60 percent increase in deportations between 1997, when said new laws went into effect, and 1998. In 2002 and 2005, the rate of those deported remained consistent, but has steadily grown since then.
Only in recent years has the Department of Homeland Security released immigration statistics on the actual criminal convictions that caused the majority of the deportations. In general, the illegal immigration statistics about those who have been deported for violent crimes has been more attainable; the information on all other causes for deportation has been kept more tightly under wraps.
It should be kept in mind that the government tends not to publish illegal immigration statistics on the number of people that they try to deport or actually deport on felony grounds. Generally, they have showcased the most violent offenders facing deportation, while keeping quiet about those who were deported for other reasons. 
Immigration statistics from public data regarding deportation, however, has recently been more accessible. Immigration statistics show that over 1.2 million illegal immigrants were deported in 2008. Almost 65 percent of immigrants were convicted of non-violent crimes and deported. That number includes non-violent theft. An additional 20 percent were deported because their convictions involved violence against other people. Roughly 15 percent of immigrants were deported due to crimes that were simply categorized as “other.” 
  
  
According to immigration statistics, deportation numbers rise drastically on a yearly basis due to increased efforts on the part of the United States Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. They dedicate their duties to deporting immigrants who have been convicted of a crime, concentrating mostly on illegal aliens.

Statistics on Legal vs. Illegal Immigration

Statistics on Legal vs. Illegal Immigration

An illegal immigrant will not automatically be deported due to their illegal status, although this usually is taken into account. Most immigrants, illegal or not, are deported due to crimes committed while on United States grounds. Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, any immigrant could be deported if their actions fall under what is considered to be a “deportable offense.” These offenses vary from criminal
Few public government statistics are kept on the number of legal immigrants deported, only the number of overall deportations. American immigration statistics tend to vary greatly due to the inconsistencies in available records. Recent studies have shown however, that roughly 1.2 million immigrants were deported in 2008. About two-thirds of those deported were deported due to non-violent crimes, compared to the 20 percent deported for violent crimes.
The only well-known statistics about illegal versus legal deportation revolve around what the United States public thinks about the legal or illegal immigrant. A survey conducted by the Public Agenda, a non-partisan research organization, showed that half of the people surveyed do not agree with giving the government power to detain legal immigrants, even in the case of a possible national security threat.
On the other hand, that same study by the Public Agenda showed that six in ten people feel that illegal immigrants do not deserve the same legal respect or protection as American nationals because they are in the United States without legal permission. In addition, six in ten also feel that any immigrant that is found to be illegal should be immediately deported without the right to appeal a deportation  
Overall, the public does not feel that an illegal immigrant should have the same rights as a legal immigrant. Either way, to reemphasize, both illegal and legal immigrants can still be deported.